Let’s Take A Different Look at N Before Spring

Humble honey
Hello, ladies and gentlemen. We’ve been doing a lot of thinking about everything that came with 2018. Drought, flooding, wind. You name it, somewhere had it last year. Harvest 2018 is not over in a lot of areas, and God bless the people who are still out trying to get done.
We’ve had incredible temperature swings this winter. Monday it was 51 degrees here in Southeast Iowa and today there’s 5 inches of snow on the ground, on top of MUD. Needless to say it’s a mess. Guys are trying to finish up “fall” work which is just crazy. This has got me thinking… What does spring look like? By now, if you have watched our LIVES, you know that I am not a fan of anhydrous. But today I want to take a more realistic approach and talk about what spring looks like.
Lots of farmers did a lot of tearing up during harvest. There are ruts everywhere that didn’t get worked in. Lots of farmers have nothing fall applied. (Which is not necessarily a bad thing) and that’s very unusual. There are a lot of people feeling a whole lot of urgency around how to get everything done.
One of the local dealerships around here is calling up ex-employees and making serious offers to try and get them to come back. Why? Because they’re trying to build staff to a point that they can get a lot done when it’s time to go this spring. They know that the work that should’ve been done last fall didn’t happen, and now they’re trying to make up for it.  To add to that we all have to deal with electronic logs and the trucks aren’t getting the stuff where it needs to be. So, here’s my question to you. How do you think that they’re going to get all that NH3 from the pickup point to the dealer, and then how’s the dealer going to get it to the dirt? I don’t see enough hours in the day. How are they going to get that 18-46-0 or that 11-52-0 and 0-0-60, another thing I’m not a fan of, or that potassium sulfate (much bigger fan.) Regardless of what you’re using, how will you get it from the terminal to the dirt? Because we’re way behind.
So, let’s take a different look. I had a guy call this week and opened his account for one reason. He said, “Rod, I’ve used anhydrous my whole life, but it’s time to make a change.” Adam wants to take a different look. He is joining us at Pro Ag in Kearney on Monday and Tuesday to learn how he can get away from it, because he don’t see any way to get it on this spring.
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We are going to help Adam use his current budget for Nitrogen and spend it smarter. We’ll start with buying $9 worth of dicyandiamide in the form of Guardian-L, which has an average ROI of $3 for every $1 invested. Then we’re going to take the dollars that are left for our Nitrogen budget, and we’re going to apply 32 with Ammonium thiosulfate. If you’d like to know the ratio we mix the 32 and ammonium thiosulfate let us know.
 
You can broadcast it with chemicals and incorporate it. You can strip it on and roll it in with a cultivator. There’s a host of other options we’ll work through with you. We are happy to help nail down the specifics down the road. Today, I just want you to take a different look. You don’t have to do it the same way you’ve been doing it for 5 years, 20 years, shoot maybe even 50 years.
 
I’ve been told in Chinese the word that means crisis also can be translated into opportunity. So if you’re on the verge of crisis, not knowing how you’re going to get N applied. Maybe THIS is YOUR opportunity to figure out how to do it differently and find a better way. If you’re open to new ideas and wanting to figure out a better way drop us a comment or call 641-919-1206.
 
PS: Kearney, Nebraska Pro Ag has 1 or two seats left for Monday and Tuesday Conference
 
South Bend, Indiana on Thursday and Friday has only a handful of seats left as well.
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